Bɹeaking the Grid

about   archive   well-adjusted queer kids   mine    ask    

a graphic design linguistics education plagued by the past and pending

October 19, 2014 at 4:26pm
0 notes

(Source: sinfest.net)

4:21pm
516 notes
Reblogged from anarchyagogo

1:02pm
179 notes
Reblogged from dave-penn

etymologies guessed correctly are so satisfying

dave-penn:

image

image

image

image

image

(via linguisticsyall)

October 18, 2014 at 4:26pm
17,077 notes
Reblogged from missmaaike

meatfart:

missmaaike:

My roommate got a decal set from target and we can’t figure out what it’s supposed to spell

pllop weeny

October 17, 2014 at 4:36pm
1 note

Alaska y Dinarama - Mi novio es un zombi (full lyrics)

"My Boyfriend is a Zombie" vocab! (it’s pretty easy so not really a lot…)

enloquecer - to drive crazy, be crazy for
un muerto viviente - the walking dead (lit. living dead) 
podrido - rotten
negar (appears as niegue) - to deny

3:38pm
16 notes
Reblogged from morphosyntax
morphosyntax:

Tomorrow, october 18th, there will be a rally in Paris in support of the Kurdish resistance in Kobane against ISIS. 
Please reblog if you have french followers, or kurdish followers. The goal of this rally is to raise awareness among french people, and demand further assistance from the french government to Kobane’s fighters.
Kobane’s not alone.

morphosyntax:

Tomorrow, october 18th, there will be a rally in Paris in support of the Kurdish resistance in Kobane against ISIS. 

Please reblog if you have french followers, or kurdish followers. The goal of this rally is to raise awareness among french people, and demand further assistance from the french government to Kobane’s fighters.

Kobane’s not alone.

3:32pm
137 notes
Reblogged from hello-language-that-is-all

hello-language-that-is-all:

Si dejas entrar a los zombis…

Zombienvenidos.

(via spanishskulduggery)

2:30pm
39,238 notes
Reblogged from bedlamsbard

bedlamsbard:

The difference between learning a modern language and an ancient language is that in first year French you learn “Where is the bathroom?” and “How do I get to the train station?” and in first year Attic Greek or Latin you learn “I have judged you worthy of death” and “The tyrant had everyone in the city killed.”

(via loscannbruthmar)

October 16, 2014 at 10:34pm
1 note

contact languages class as usual, someone brought up SEEED, who mix German and Jamaican Creole~

4:30pm
3 notes
swiped from carables (via interalia?) somewhere. Maybe useful, I look at it doing problem sets because I’m terrible at labeling these kind of things just from glosses. (or also thinking about Spanish preterite vs. imperfect, heh.) Should note it’s really a tense + aspect chart. 

swiped from carables (via interalia?) somewhere. Maybe useful, I look at it doing problem sets because I’m terrible at labeling these kind of things just from glosses. (or also thinking about Spanish preterite vs. imperfect, heh.) Should note it’s really a tense + aspect chart. 

morphosyntax:

mermaidemm:

In French, you don’t really say “I miss you.” You say “tu me manques,” which is closer to “you are missing from me.” I love that. “You are missing from me.” You are a part of me, you are essential to my being. You are like a limb, or an organ, or blood. I cannot function without you. 

Mental verbs are not prototypically transitive, so it is not at all unusual to see this type of construction where the stimulus (the thing that triggers the feeling) is marked as the grammatical subject, and the experiencer (the entity in which the feeling arises) is encoded as an oblique. This type of construction is called “dative-experiencer”.

There are other kinds of patterns of course, including the “agent-like experiencer” kind where the predicate behaves like a normal transitive verb (just like in the english example ‘i miss you’), and another kind called “patient-like experiencer” where the experiencer is marked as the object and the stimulus as the subject (as in ‘this worries me’). 

The point is that, even if European languages (from the Standard Average European linguistic area) have a predilection for the agent-like experiencer pattern, outside this group, dative-experiencer constructions are everything but extraordinary.

yessss. Drives me up the wall when people are like in X you say it like “this” and I think that’s sOo lovely. Like yeah cool, new ways to think about things, I love the ways languages create information (yes please Mandarin resultative complements) but don’t get all exotifying and weird. When you add yr poetry shit (in English) that’s all you; pragmatically it has the same weight as “I miss you” in English, French speakers don’t like, miss more intensely. This kind of thing can actually trip you up in learning if you don’t realize how common a phrase actually sounds. To borrow a great example, “collaborate” in English sounds very power-meeting business-person. Colaborar is typically the Spanish translation, but is waaay more common. If you think about it in English you won’t use it as much as you should. 

UGH what even is translation sometimes, something being “closer” to something. If I word-for-word translate 我有三年多的貓被他的尾巴放在你的嘴裡。you get “I have three years more cat their tail put in your mouth.” Yeah sounds great. What does it mean? “The cat I’ve had for a little more than three years put their tail in your mouth.” But oh that’s so boring it doesn’t capture the fact that Mandarin is a RelN language not a NRel one like English. Bummer.