Bɹeaking the Grid

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a graphic design linguistics education plagued by the past and pending

September 20, 2014 at 10:33am
26,186 notes
Reblogged from feminism5ever

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

trungles:

theblacksophisticate:

feminism5ever:

When people say “culture is meant to be shared” I’m literally like ???? Because that has literally never been the purpose of any culture. Culture is about identity, community and family. It’s about tradition. It is not and has never been about “sharing”.

Say it!

They keep saying “shared” when they mean “made available for my consumption.”

and boom goes the dynamite

I think maybe in particular it wouldn’t hurt (white) language-learners to think about this? Like sure you wanna go out there and help maintain languages and you looove their culture; ok well the end goal shouldn’t be YOU learning it, it should be destroying the hegemonic power of English monolingualism and reinstating other languages as viable ways for communities to keep living. Having a written grammar of a language doesn’t keep it alive, speakers who can use it all the time do. 

Even with big established national languages I think it’s easy to slip into this consumption idea without acknowledging that language is very connected to culture and is not just another cool skill to pick up uncritically. 

(via loscannbruthmar)

September 19, 2014 at 12:50pm
1 note
Vocabat has a great post up right now about placeholder words! Never slip back into “umm that” again! My favorite is definitely cachivache, but really I mostly use cosita. 

Vocabat has a great post up right now about placeholder words! Never slip back into “umm that” again! My favorite is definitely cachivache, but really I mostly use cosita. 

September 18, 2014 at 10:24am
0 notes

The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu →

A lot of people are attracted to linguistics by words,” he said. “But language is about so much more. And for scholars, the language of food is particularly rich: it’s universal, it’s social and now it’s easily available online.”

True to his book’s subtitle, Mr. Jurafsky, 51, likes to read menus — preferably, tens of thousands or even millions at a time. A 2002 MacArthur “genius” award winner for his work on how computers process human language, he has more recently turned to the social side of computational linguistics, crunching huge, often food-related data sets, like the New York Public Library’s recently digitized historical menu collection or Yelp’s vast archive of restaurant reviews, to tease out nearly invisible patterns in our everyday use of language.

!!! ah I love dissecting Yelp reviews. Also if you want to go straight to his blog, it’s here.

September 16, 2014 at 10:20am
125 notes
Reblogged from eslapera

romancingthelanguages:

eslapera:

¿Do you know what Llanito is? ¿What about Llanito people?

If you’ve ever been to Gibraltar (English enclave in the extreme South of Spain)  you surely know what we are talking about. Today’s linguistic fun fact is that very peculiar speech variety that doesn’t quite fills all the requisites to be called a language, nor a creole so we can only call it a linguistic variety. Some people may think it’s simply spanglish, but (instead of American English and Latin American Spanish) Llanito mixes British English and Andalusian Spanish it’s lexicon has more than 500 features coming from Genoese, Hebrew, Arabic, Portuguese and Maltese.

Quite interesting, isn’t it?  

[Article by Es la Pera translation by me] If you can check the poster blog, it’s in Spanish and it deals with literature and above all translation also please watch the video, you won’t be disappointed.

! I’m in a contact languages class right now, gonna see if people have some interesting thoughts on this, I’m curious as to how it doesn’t fit a language/creole definition…seems a little more together than just really intense code-switching hah

(via spanishskulduggery)

7:53am
82 notes
Reblogged from bauldoff

bauldoff:

Really loving these porcelain Fruit and Vegetable Peels Cups by Taiwan’s ViiCHENDESIGN. The intent is to create a deeper connection between the contents of the cup and the exterior form, a connection which is reinforced by touching the textured surface and associating it with the food or beverage within. via MOCO LOCO

super nice balance between natural design but still clearly a set.

(via tradchinesechars)

September 15, 2014 at 10:25pm
1 note
burnout

burnout

(Source: juxtapoz.com)

10:23pm
1 note
nah because it doesn’t show up for 繁體, but yeah that’s what I thought at first. This dictionary is otherwise pretty good about regionalisms (like 計程車 vs 出租汽車)

nah because it doesn’t show up for 繁體, but yeah that’s what I thought at first. This dictionary is otherwise pretty good about regionalisms (like 計程車 vs 出租汽車)

11:45am
221 notes
Reblogged from curiosaplenty

Phonetics of Consonants Poster →

allthingslinguistic:

curiosaplenty:

I saw this visualisation of the IPA consonant symbols located in the mouth reblogged elsewhere today. I’ve succeeded in locating down the designer and hi-Res versions. Yipee! It seems to be part of an “Introduction to Phonetics” pack.

These are really great visualizations (the flickr link includes both consonants and vowels) and I’d definitely recommend them to anyone teaching or learning the International Phonetic Alphabet.

See also: the IPA vowel chart superimposed on a diagram of the vocal tract and the IPA for English as an elaborate set diagram.

(via lifeasawug)

11:44am
2 notes
正體/繁體 update
To add to the confusion, my dictionary thinks 正體 is used in Taiwan, but my prof has a weird thing against Taiwan so that seemed unlikely. Asking a very small pool of Taiwanese/Taiwanese-Americans it seems they all use 繁體 and that China uses 正體. So now the question is still why, where did they come from…and what other lies is my dictionary slipping me. 

正體/繁體 update

To add to the confusion, my dictionary thinks 正體 is used in Taiwan, but my prof has a weird thing against Taiwan so that seemed unlikely. Asking a very small pool of Taiwanese/Taiwanese-Americans it seems they all use 繁體 and that China uses 正體. So now the question is still why, where did they come from…and what other lies is my dictionary slipping me. 

September 14, 2014 at 5:16pm
0 notes

Taoist (Daoist) Chinese Characters : Daoism Depot : Encyclopedia Depot →

Kind of a random page, but it’s got some nice comparisons of standard style and seal style writing, and also of characters made up of multiples of the same character…

䲜 -ye, lots of fish

woah didn’t see that coming.

September 13, 2014 at 10:58am
1 note

正體/繁體

Question for the internet: what is the deal with using 正體 (zhengti) or 繁體 (fanti) for traditional characters? My new prof just told me to use 正體, but didn’t explain where either came from etc, and google isn’t being helpful. Also he is kind of weird and has like a thing against Taiwan so I want to make sure his choice is something reasonable not something super political…

tumblr, this is a question?